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Poll: Large Majority Expect Hospitals To Use EMRs

More than three quarters of the American public expects hospitals to use electronic medical records, according to Morning Consult polling. But not nearly as many are convinced that health IT is secure, with only 53 percent saying they trust the safety of the electronic records.  People without insurance or a college degree were the least likely groups to expect a health provider to use an electronic medical record or trust that they were safe.

Survey respondents said they prefer their doctors and nurses to use laptops and iPads to enter health data, with 38 percent backing an iPad and 34 percent selecting a laptop. A significant majority, 60 percent, said they would be open to using an app themselves to store medical records.

LIKELY VOTERS EXPECT HOSPITALS TO ADOPT ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS

Eighty-three percent of likely voters expect hospitals to use electronic medical records. Younger respondents aged 18-29 had slightly lower expectations of health providers using electronic medical records, at 79 percent.

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People who do not have insurance were less likely than those with insurance to expect hospitals to use electronic medical records, with 68 percent of the uninsured expecting an electronic medical record versus over 80 percent for insured.

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 TRUST IN MEDICAL RECORD SAFETY DECREASES WITH AGE

Although most people expect their hospitals to use electronic medical records, they aren’t all convinced the records are safe. Fifty-three percent said they trust that the records are safe, while 39 percent said they were worried about safety. Trust in medical record security decreases as age increases.

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As education-level increased, so did respondents’ beliefs that medical records were safe. Only 50 percent of people without a college or advanced degree trusted the safety of their medical records, while 57 percent and 61 percent of those with a Bachelor’s Degree or post-grad education, respectively, trusted the security of their records.

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The trust gap only deepened when comparing the insured and uninsured. Only 41 percent of the uninsured believe their medical records are safe, compared with more than 50 percent trusting safety from other health insurance plans. Here, the uninsured population’s risk aversion in terms of their medical records’ safety clearly shows.

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LAPTOPS AND IPADS APPEAR TO BE PROMISING HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES MOVING FORWARD

Most people expect doctors and nurses to use laptops and iPads to enter health data, with 38 and 34 percent of the population responding as such respectively.

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LIKELY VOTERS WILLING TO USE POSSIBLE APPLICATION

A majority of those surveyed said they were open to using an application to store medical records.

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When asked the same question, the uninsured still polled lower than those that were insured, at 51 percent versus 60 percent for those with insurance.

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METHODOLOGY

This two-part poll was conducted from March 21-23, 2014, and May 2-4, 2014, among a national sample of 3,687 registered voters. The data were poll and were weighted to approximate a target sample of registered voters based on age, race/ethnicity, gender, educational attainment, region, annual household income, home ownership status and marital status. Results from the full survey have a margin of error of plus or minus two percentage points.

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